Feb 24, 2021

Time:

Location: Virtual

By: Cosyne

The annual Cosyne meeting provides an inclusive forum for the exchange of experimental and theoretical/computational approaches to problems in systems neuroscience. Cosyne topics include (but are not limited to): neural basis of behavior, sensory and motor systems, circuitry, learning, neural coding, natural scene statistics, dendritic computation, neural basis of persistent activity, nonlinear receptive field mapping, representations of time and sequence, reward systems, decision-making, synaptic plasticity, map formation and plasticity, population coding, attention, and computation with spiking networks. Participants include pure experimentalists, pure theorists, and everything in between. Abstract submission deadline: November 12, 2020.

Mar 03, 2021

Time: 3:30-4:30pm (EST)

Location: Virtual

By: Society for Neuroscience

This webinar is exclusive for SfN members. The COVID-19 pandemic has created unprecedented challenges worldwide and has affected neuroscientists at all career stages. Neuroscientists who are actively looking for a postdoctoral fellowship or faculty position are facing hiring freezes and uncertainty. During this webinar, panelists based in academia and industry will highlight the challenges the pandemic has created for neuroscience employers and job seekers and provide job seekers with strategies for finding and applying for jobs at this time. Recent graduates, postdoctoral fellows, and early- and mid-career neuroscientists who are looking for a position in academia or industry are encouraged to attend. This session will include Michelle D. Jones-London, PhD, as one of the speakers. Dr. Jones-London serves as chief of the Office of Programs to Enhance Neuroscience Workforce Diversity (OPEN-WD) at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS / NIH).

By: National Institutes of Health (NIH)

February 5, 2021; February 17, 2021; March 5, 2021; March 17, 2021; March 31, 2021. The purpose of this series of workshops, co-hosted by The BRAIN Initiative and the Department of Energy Office of Science, is to bring together researchers with a broad array of expertise to discuss the state of the art in mapping complete neural circuits, the opportunities for advancing connectomics technologies, and the challenges that need to be addressed to generate comprehensive maps of brain connectivity – “wiring diagrams” spanning the entire mammalian brain. Visit https://brainconnectivityseries.com for additional workshop details, including links to the registration and agendas.

Mar 06, 2021 -
Mar 11, 2021

Location: Moscone Center San Francisco, CA

By: SPIE - The International Society for Optics and Photonics

SPIE Photonics West is the world's leading photonics technologies event. Over 22,000 people attend Photonics West each year to learn, connect, and find the latest research and products. Topics cover biomedical optics, biophotonics, lasers, industrial lasers, optoelectronics, microfabrication, MOEMS-MEMS, displays, and more. Six days, two exhibitions, 1,400 companies, 5,200 papers, networking events, industry sessions, courses, and a co-located AR, VR, MR conference make this the most important annual event in the optics and photonics market. 1. BIOS, the largest biophotonics, biomedical optics, and imaging conference 2. LASE, the industrial laser, laser source, and laser application conference 3. OPTO, the optoelectronics, photonic materials and devices conference 4. Photonics West Exhibition, the largest annual exhibition for the optics and photonics industry. 5. BiOS Expo, the world's largest biomedical optics and biophotonics exhibition 6. AR/VR/MR 2021, co-located with Photonics West, focuses on making XR hardware safer, better, more comfortable, and available.

Mar 08, 2021 -
Mar 10, 2021

Location: Virtual

By: Allen Institute for Brain Science

For almost 20 years, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has accelerated our understanding of how the brain works in health and disease through its unique big, team and open science approach. The public data and resources available at brain-map.org are used by tens of thousands of scientists globally each year. In collaboration with the Allen Institute’s Next Generation Leaders, we bring you a scientific symposium spotlighting our current efforts: to build a “periodic table” of brain cell types, map neural connectivity, and understand and model neuronal activity. The program will feature the latest findings by Allen Institute scientists as well as researchers across the field who use Allen Institute data or tools for their work. Each day of the symposium will culminate with hands-on tutorials to learn how to get started with finding, accessing, and analyzing selected open resources available at brain-map.org and why those resources may be useful for your research. Leading up to the symposium, join us for more tutorial webinars leading up to the symposium to learn how and why to integrate additional open resources into your research. This event is geared towards working scientists at the undergraduate, graduate, postdoc, staff scientist, and faculty levels, including those in both academia and industry.

Mar 09, 2021 -
Mar 11, 2021

Time: 10:00 am EST

Location: Virtual

By: National Institutes of Health (NIH)

The goal of this workshop is to bring together neuroscientists, tool developers/engineers, and industry partners to identify new non-invasive functional imaging tools that could be realized in the next five to ten years. Discussion topics will include how to maximize potential impact of these technologies on human neuroscience research, and identification of possible pathways for their dissemination. Presentations will be posted prior to the workshop, and the discussion will be broadcast to the public. Please be aware of a companion workshop on Dissemination of Non-Invasive Imaging Technologies scheduled for March 9-11, 2021. The workshop will be livestreamed the day of the event and archived using NIH Videocast. You may click on the links below for more information and to download an iCal to save this event to your personal calendar. Day 1, March 9, 2021 https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=40182; Day 2, March 10, 2021 https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=40183; Day 3, March 11, 2021 https://videocast.nih.gov/watch=40184. A Request for Information released January 15 seeks public feedback on Development and Dissemination of Human Brain Imaging Technologies (NOT-NS-21-024). You or your organization can submit ideas by April 1, 2021. https://www.ninds.nih.gov/NOT-NS-21-024

Mar 15, 2021 -
Mar 21, 2021

Location: Nationwide

By: Dana Foundation

Brain Awareness Week (BAW) is a nationwide effort organized by the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives and the Society for Neuroscience to promote the public and personal benefits of brain research. The official week for the next BAW is March 15-21, 2021, but any week is a good time to get involved.

By: National Institutes of Health (NIH)

February 5, 2021; February 17, 2021; March 5, 2021; March 17, 2021; March 31, 2021. The purpose of this series of workshops, co-hosted by The BRAIN Initiative and the Department of Energy Office of Science, is to bring together researchers with a broad array of expertise to discuss the state of the art in mapping complete neural circuits, the opportunities for advancing connectomics technologies, and the challenges that need to be addressed to generate comprehensive maps of brain connectivity – “wiring diagrams” spanning the entire mammalian brain. Visit https://brainconnectivityseries.com for additional workshop details, including links to the registration and agendas.

By: IEEE Brain

Speaker: Dr. Damien Coyle, Ulster University. Summary: This webinar will cover two current hot topics in EEG-based brain-computer interface research and research ongoing at the Intelligent Systems Research Centre. Part 1 will focus on assessment of patients with prolonged disorder of consciousness (PDoC). Motor imagery brain-computer interface (MI-BCI) may facilitate willful modulation of sensorimotor oscillations in patients with PDoC, enabling assessment of awareness and question answering by imagining movement and thus, potentially, movement-independent neuropsychological assessment. We evaluated this potential with a cohort of PDoC patients (n=24). Whilst results revealed patients across the PDoC spectrum have capacity to learn to modulate sensorimotor rhythms and respond to closed questions, differences in patient cognition are more likely to be revealed after extended training with feedback and more intensive question-and-answer sessions. Part 2 will focus on direct speech BCIs. Several recent studies have harnessed overt speech to examine linguistic communication through neural signals. While imagined speech is the holy grail modality for a BCI based on language, systematic study of imagined speech has been relatively sparse. The phenomenology of imagined speech, its relationship to overt speech, and the effect of different stimuli on efforts to elicit and label its neural correlations to enable algorithms to learn to detect and classify it, are currently not well understood. Employing the first picture-naming paradigm in speech BCI research, this talk will show that effects of stimuli/cues on speech decoding from EEG are highly significant, whilst linguistic properties of semantics and syntax are not and that overt speech is easier to decode from EEG than imagined speech.

By: National Institutes of Health (NIH)

February 5, 2021; February 17, 2021; March 5, 2021; March 17, 2021; March 31, 2021. The purpose of this series of workshops, co-hosted by The BRAIN Initiative and the Department of Energy Office of Science, is to bring together researchers with a broad array of expertise to discuss the state of the art in mapping complete neural circuits, the opportunities for advancing connectomics technologies, and the challenges that need to be addressed to generate comprehensive maps of brain connectivity – “wiring diagrams” spanning the entire mammalian brain. Visit https://brainconnectivityseries.com for additional workshop details, including links to the registration and agendas.

Apr 22, 2021 -
Apr 25, 2021

Location: Westward Look Resort, Tucson, Arizona

By: Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, Frederick Gardner Cottrell Foundation, and Research Corporation for Science Advancement

The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group is excited to cosponsor a multi-year initiative addressing the effect that the gut microbiome has on the brain in health and disease with the Research Corporation for Science Advancement. Kathy Richmond, Director of the Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, and Alexandra Basford, Program Officer for the Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, will attend the inaugural conference of this series, postponed to April 22-25, 2021.