NEWS

02/13/2020

In 2019, we learned that studying the brains of ‘singing mice’ can offer clues in how the human brain manages conversations.

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In 2019, we learned that studying the brains of ‘singing mice’ can offer clues in how the human brain manages conversations. In a study supported by the Simons Collaboration for the Global Brain, BRAIN Initiative scientist Dr. Michael Long at the New York University School of Medicine measured brain activity from musical mice while they sang duets, and discovered a brain region critical for the split-second timing of songs. This fascinating work – which was featured in the New York Times and Popular Science, and even made the cover of Science Magazine – may lead to therapies for communication disorders, such as autism.

In 2019, we learned that studying the brains of ‘singing mice’ can offer clues in how the human brain manages conversations. In a study supported by the Simons Collaboration for the Global Brain, BRAIN Initiative scientist Dr. Michael Long at the New York University School of Medicine measured brain activity from musical mice while they sang duets, and discovered a brain region critical for the split-second timing of songs. This fascinating work – which was featured in the New York Times and Popular Science, and even made the cover of Science Magazine – may lead to therapies for communication disorders, such as autism.